Inspired By Water Brunch with Salva Oct. 14 in Rochester

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Join us for brunch with Salva as we celebrate our 15th anniversary on Sunday, Oct. 14 at La Luna Restaurant in Rochester, NY.

Inspired by Water celebrates 15 years of bringing clean, safe water to isolated villages in South Sudan. In a historic building with a terrace and waterfall view, the event features a delicious buffet, handcrafted African pieces and paintings by Rochester artist Steve Roe in the WFSS Marketplace, and live auction prizes including a private brunch with Salva at Mario's Homemade Pasta Kitchen, and a dinner with Salva at La Luna Restaurant.

Salva will visit each table at the event to personally offer his gratitude.

Salva will also present the 3rd annual Founder's Award to St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Rochester, and the 3rd annual Long Walk Award to WFSS Board member Angelique Stevens.

12:00 P.M.  Browse our WFSS Marketplace
1:00 P.M.    Brunch is served
1:30 P.M.    Founder's and Long Walk Awards & Live Auction

 

WFSS Completes 2017-18 Season

WFSS is pleased to announce the completion of another successful season!

 Well drilled in Lol-Kou village in Aweil State

Well drilled in Lol-Kou village in Aweil State

Thank you to our team in South Sudan, and our donors around the world who support our work. Together, we are transforming lives in South Sudan, and helping to build a more sustainable future.

Our staff in South Sudan continues to grow, accomplishing more and positioning WFSS as a local leader in delivering WASH (Water, Sanitation & Hygiene) services. WFSS Country Directors Ater Akol “Lion” Thiep and Ajang “AJ” Agok managed another successful season with 40 new wells drilled; 28 older wells rehabilitated; hygiene education in 68 villages; and, the completion of our first-ever sanitation project.

 The DR-150 has been drilling since 2008.

The DR-150 has been drilling since 2008.

This season’s new wells were drilled using our 10 year-old DR-150 rig in Wau, Aweil and Aweil East States. The team accomplished this goal with the help of the rehab team, which functioned as a platform team. After a well was drilled, this freed up the drilling team to travel to the next location and continue drilling.

WFSS is in the process of purchasing its new drilling rig, aka “Iron Giraffe.” Read more here.

 

 Marko and Bantino received hygiene training in Majok Kuel village in Aweil State.

Marko and Bantino received hygiene training in Majok Kuel village in Aweil State.

TRANSFORMING LIVES, ONE VILLAGE AT A TIME

Mayiik Bol is a 32-year-old physically challenged man who lives in Yargot County, Aweil East State. He has five children, two of whom are also physically challenged. Mayiik is grateful to WFSS for helping his family and neighbors access safe clean drinking water. “After Water for South Sudan drilled a well, we can access water nearby. Family life has changed for the better as our water needs were resolved by availability of water.”

Deborah Awieu Deng said WFSS helped provide her family with safe clean drinking water. “Before the WFSS team came, life was so bad because we collected water from unprotected sources. This water was prone to causing diarrhea and typhoid. Distance to water sources was so long, sometimes you may fail to get water on time, which could result in sleeping without food and even without taking a bath. Our cattle were suffering with us too, because where we reach water was a two-three hours’ walk on foot. Some cattle got lost on the way back home because hyenas attacked them on the way.”

She thanks Water for South Sudan for coming to their rescue by providing safe clean drinking water. “The life of our livestock now is now more secure, and the WFSS hygiene team has played an important role in preventing water borne diseases.”

HYGIENE EDUCATION IMPROVES LIVES

Two WFSS Hygiene teams, overseen by WFSS Hygiene Manager Mathew Akuar Akuar, completed hygiene education in 68 villages- training eight people in each village that received a new well or rehabbed well.  The teams share information on how germs are spread, and instruct villagers in how to keep wells and jerry cans clean, helping to maximize the impact of clean water.

Mathiang Deng Mawiir noted how WFSS hygiene training is improving lives. “They helped me in how I should maintain my well, and helped me and my community with good hygiene practices. WFSS gave me sanitation knowledge where my main source of water will only be our new well, and safe disposal of feces. The WFSS hygiene team has played an important role in preventing water borne diseases. I would like to thank WFSS for a job well done.”

WFSS COMPLETES PILOT SANITATION PROJECT

 The Zogolona School community welcomed the opening of the new latrine.

The Zogolona School community welcomed the opening of the new latrine.

After careful assessment, the Zogolona Primary School in Wau was chosen as our site. The WFSS drilling team installed the first well of the 2017-18 season at the Zogolona School. Following this, the World Food Programme agreed to provide one meal a day for the 800 students at the school, providing essential nutrition for growing children.

WFSS broke ground on a latrine project in January. The project was managed by WFSS Country Director Ajang Agok, with guidance and oversight by US Operations Support Coordinator Gary Prok, and WFSS Board member Sue Coia. The US team received regular updates and photos of the project, assisting as needed as the construction progressed.

 Finished latrine building at zogolona school in wau.

Finished latrine building at zogolona school in wau.

The WFSS US Board and staff team visited in March and observed the project in progress, and met with school officials and local government officials, all of whom expressed deep gratitude for the project.  "We are grateful and give thanks to government and WFSS for your hard work," said Deputy Principal Garang John. "We wish you a safe journey back. We can now eat the sweet fruit of water which is life itself.  WFSS has done a great job. Keep up the spirit of what you have done. You will be in the history of Zogolona Primary School.  The community will stand strongly for fundraising to support the latrine for the future."

 

The project was completed in June, and the latrine was officially handed over to the school. WFSS will carefully monitor the school's upkeep and maintenance of the project to ensure they stay in compliance with the memorandum of understanding that the school signed with WFSS agreement. WFSS Country Director Ajang is optimistic about the future success of the latrine project. 

"This community is committed," says AJ. "They are so grateful for this latrine and will make sure it is sustainable into the future. Zogolona will qualify for more latrines if they sustain this one well."

WFSS US TEAM VISITS SOUTH SUDAN            

A US team of staff and board members visited South Sudan this spring to meet with government and NGO representatives, visit our team in Wau, and also traveled to the field to witness well drilling firsthand. Read Executive Director Lynn Malooly’s blog posts here.

 

 Board member anne turner, salva dut, executive director lynn malooly, board president glenn m. balch, jr., country director aj agok in juba.

Board member anne turner, salva dut, executive director lynn malooly, board president glenn m. balch, jr., country director aj agok in juba.

 

 

WE COULDN’T DO IT WITHOUT YOU!

Thank you to our contributors in all 50 US states and 49 other countries for enabling our work! With your help we are watering the seeds of change and transforming lives in South Sudan. We are already planning for the 2018-19 season and ask for your help in strengthening communities in South Sudan. There is so much we can do with your support.  Thank you.

WFSS Drills 300th Well in South Sudan!

Water for South Sudan reached a significant milestone last week with the drilling of our 300th well. Starting with our first well, drilled in Founder Salva Dut's village in 2005, we have not stopped in our mission to bring access to clean water in South Sudan. Despite continuing challenges in South Sudan, our work continues, and we continue to transform lives.

Water for South Sudan's 2017 season is winding down as the end of the dry season approaches in May. Once the rainy season starts in earnest our vehicles are not able to travel through the muddy "roads" of South Sudan. Until the rains come, however, our drilling, rehab and hygiene teams will continue to reach remote, rural villages in need of clean water and hygiene education.

 well sponsored by employees of hmh, publishers of  a long walk to water.

well sponsored by employees of hmh, publishers of a long walk to water.

Our drilling team, led by "A.J" Agok, our Assistant Country Director, has drilled 19 new wells this season, bringing our total to over 300 wells drilled since 2005. Each new well brings greater health and stability to a village. Access to clean water means that girls and women no longer have to walk miles to gather water that is often dirty and contaminated. A well in a village can be the first step toward stability and development. Markets, schools and clinics can grow up in a village that has access to water.

Our pilot well rehabilitation team, led by WFSS Country Director Ater Thiep, has had a very successful year, going over their original goal of rehabilitating 20 of our oldest wells, and has repaired 26 wells as of April 24, 2017. The creation of the rehab team grew out of our 2015 well evaluation trip in which we were able to visit 80 of our wells. While we found that all wells were operational and producing fresh water, we also found that the cement platforms on some of the oldest wells were worn and eroded. This prompted a look at our procedures, and led to an improvement on many aspects. Our rehab team reports that villagers are very pleased with the results.

 an older well, before wfss rehab's work. see below for repaired well!

an older well, before wfss rehab's work. see below for repaired well!

Both the drilling team and rehab team are using a new design this year, which includes better cement mixing for the cement platforms and animal drinking troughs. Our US Operations Team designed a long narrow drinking trough, leading away from the well head, for animals to drink. This allows villagers to get water for their animals without adding more wear and tear on the cement, and also keeps the animals away from the well head. Other NGOs in South Sudan have been interested in our new design and have given us positive feedback on its efficiency.

 villagers celebrate repaired well, ensuring a future with access to fresh water

villagers celebrate repaired well, ensuring a future with access to fresh water

In addition to drilling and rehab, we now have two hygiene education teams, one each traveling with the drilling and rehab teams, helping to improve hygiene practices in every village we visit.

WFSS strives to involve community members, and give local ownership in everything we do. Wells are installed after consulting with county officials, and village elders determine final placement of the wells. Hygiene education addresses the specific needs of a village, training four men and four women in each village. These villagers can then train others, helping to share education which improve health, hygiene, and the impact of clean water.

The 2017 season will be coming to a close soon. Once this season ends we will debrief with our team and begin plans for the next season.

South Sudan faces many challenges, but our teams are safe and able to do their work. We are in continual contact with them and are always assessing the safety and security both in the country, and in the areas in which we work. Our team assures us that our work can continue. 

Water for South Sudan thanks all of our supporters, across the US and around the world, who enable our work.

Celebrate in Rochester & Boston with Salva this November!

WFSS Founder Salva Dut will travel to the US in November for a few special events with supporters in Rochester, NY and Boston.

Salva starts his visit with Linda Sue Park at the Rochester Children's Book Festival on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 9:30-11 a.m. at Monroe Community College. The festival's 20th anniversary will honor New York Times bestseller A Long Walk to Water by Newbery Award-winning author Linda Sue Park. The festival's theme is Books Change Readers, Readers Change the World. More information available here.

Rooted in Rochester, Blooming in South SudanWFSS Celebration Brunch Sunday, Nov. 13. Join Salva and WFSS at the beautiful ARTISANworks in Rochester, NY as we celebrate the closing of our capital campaign. Meet Salva and hear updates from South Sudan. There will be a live auction of artwork, African handcrafts and WFSS photos and art for sale, and more. Information and tickets available here

Meet Salva & WFSS in Boston!  WFSS will host a special celebration at Boston's Metropolitan Waterworks Museum on Thursday, Nov. 17, starting with a VIP Reception from 6-7 p.m., followed by a Celebration from 7-8:30 p.m. Meet Salva and get updates on our work in South Sudan. More information, tickets and registration available here.

Finally, on Saturday, Nov. 19, Salva will speak at TEDxBeaconStreet, followed by a special teen event in Brookline. Watch the TEDx talk, or register to attend at TEDxBeaconStreet website.

WFSS in the News on World Water Day

Water for South Sudan's celebration of World Water Day, March 22, 2016 included news coverage in Rochester, NY and online in the Huffington Post and Forbes.com, as WFSS kicked off our Watering the Seeds of Change Capital Campaign. On March 22 WFSS had already raised $750,000 toward a goal of $1,500,000 to replace worn drilling equipment, bolster staff in the US and South Sudan, and develop a pilot sanitation project.

An article by Ryan Scott, Founder and CEO at Causecast, appeared on both the Huffington Post and Forbes.com. In his article, On World Water Day, A Story To Make You Feel Good About The World, Scott talks about WFSS Founder Salva Dut and how New York Times bestseller A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park inspired the book's publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) to donate $15,000 to drill a well in South Sudan.  HMH also created an employee giving campaign which raised an additional $15,000 in just two weeks.

Scott noted that the employee effort "thrilled the employees of HMH and drew many of them closer to their company, connecting them with the larger purpose and impact of their jobs. All because of one boy’s determination to survive and then help the people he left behind."


WFSS Interview on World Water Day

WFSS Founder Salva Dut and WFSS Executive Director Lynn Malooly were interviewed on local Fox news show "Good Day Rochester."

Salva talked about WFSS operations in South Sudan and how a new well impacts a village.  Salva said that "drilling the well is just the beginning, you see a lot happening around the well." He noted that clean water brings improved health and greater opportunity for all, including opportunities for children to go to school.

"That seed of water you plant triggers so many things," he said. Salva also thanked the Rochester community for helping him start WFSS, and also thanked supporters around the world for helping WFSS carry out its mission in the world's newest country.

He noted that today "we are all one village, taking care of one another." 

 

Other media coverage included a radio story on local PBS affiliate WXXI.

 

A Conversation with Salva and Linda Sue March 18

Join us for a livestream presentation, A Conversation with Salva and Linda Sue on Friday, March 18 at 12 noon, EST. 

WFSS Founder Salva Dut and Newbery Award-winning author Linda Sue Park will talk about the story behind A Long Walk to Water and the success of WFSS in bringing access to water in South Sudan.

The talk is available to all, but you must pre-register to get the link for the talk.   Please send an email with your name, and, if applicable, your school's name and address to SalvaLindaSue@waterforsouthsudan.org.  You will need an internet connection and access to YouTube to watch the talk.

World Toilet Day is November 19

World Toilet Day is a day to take action. It is a day to raise awareness about all people who do not have access to a toilet – despite the human right to water and sanitation. It is a day to do something about it.

Of the world’s seven billion people, 2.4 billion people do not have improved sanitation. 1 billion people still defecate in the open. Poor sanitation increases the risk of disease and malnutrition, especially for women and children.

We cannot accept this situation. Sanitation is a global development priority. This is why in 2013 the United Nations General Assembly officially designated November 19 as World Toilet Day. World Toilet Day is coordinated by UN-Water in collaboration with governments and relevant stakeholders.

 Improving sanitation and hygiene is one of the most crucial steps towards supporting better nutrition and improved health. In addition, investments in sanitation benefit women.

Check out the blog post on The link between gender equality and sanitation. post  by Junaid Ahmad, World Bank Group Senior Director for Water and Caren Grown, World Bank Group Senior Director for Gender. The blog originally appeared in Thomson Reuters Foundation.  

Lost Boy Finds Water in South Sudan

Journalist Ben Dobbin traveled to South Sudan in February of 2015 to follow the progress of Water for South Sudan. His account appeared in the Rochester, NY Democrat and Chronicle on June 1, 2015, and USA Today on June 2, 2015.

 Women carrying water in South Sudan. Photo by Ben Dobbin.

Women carrying water in South Sudan. Photo by Ben Dobbin.

Dobbin reports on the success of WFSS, which has now drilled 257 wells in remote villages in South Sudan since 2005. Founded by former "Lost Boy" of Sudan, Salva Dut, WFSS is based in Rochester, New York, USA, but has an operations center, and full-time South Sudanese management team in South Sudan.

The article notes the incredible impact of clean water in South Sudan.

From bathing, cooking and drinking safely to growing a vegetable plot or building a traditional mud-hut tukel, having clean water at hand is a "step up for people who really need it," adds Dut. "Give them a lift and somehow they push on and help themselves."

Read  the full article here.