Give the Gift of Clean Water This Mother's Day

Clean water for a happy Mother’s Day.

Clean water for a happy Mother’s Day.

Cards, chocolates and flowers will be given to many women this Sunday for Mother’s Day. For a mother in a developing country however, the preparations are starkly different. Women are hoping to obtain clean water, sanitation and hygiene in order to keep themselves and their children safe, healthy and alive.

These things that people living in developed nations often take for granted, including clean water, would have a positive lasting impact on mothers in underdeveloped countries. The health of women and children, particularly pregnant women and young children, is often directly linked to the access of clean water, sanitation and hygiene. Without clean water and sanitation, women and children are more prone to infections and diseases, and are forced to travel for hours a day to obtain these basic rights, making them more vulnerable to experiencing violence. When these young girls and mothers spend hours every day walking to water sources, there is no time for them to attend school, and without clean water, the hope of education is gone.

Read more about the need for complete WASH (water, sanitation, hygiene) programs to ensure maternal health: No Maternal Health Without Clean Water by Katie Millar, MPH, RN, Technical Writer and Publication Coordinator, Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

On May 12th, consider donating in honor of or in memory of a mother in your life. Your donation will help bring clean water, sanitation, and hygiene to another mother and child in South Sudan. Following your donation, you will receive a downloadable card in order to show the mother in your life how much they mean to you!

Access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene would be our wish to help every mother have a Happy Mother's Day.

To give the gift of clean water, please visit our donate page.


Plans for WFSS 2018-19 Season

WFSS looks forward to serving many more people this year, thanks to our supporters around the world. WFSS teams plan to drill 40 new wells, rehabilitate up to 50 older wells, and provide hygiene education in all villages they visit, impacting over 50,000 people in remote villages. Read on for more details on the 2018-19 season.

Villagers in Jur River County show their appreciation to WFSS for repairing their well.

Villagers in Jur River County show their appreciation to WFSS for repairing their well.

Season’s Plans

Our Country Directors usually aim for an early start to give themselves enough time should there be any delays. The rehab team got an extra early start, beginning in early October. As of December 11, they have rehabbed 24 older wells and also provided hygiene education in those villages, serving close to 20,000 people.

We had planned to start drilling in December, but a slowdown at the border has pushed that start to January. One of the many challenges our teams face is crossing the border into South Sudan. WFSS purchases most of our drilling supplies in Kampala, Uganda, and sends them to South Sudan by truck. Customs paperwork is often time-consuming, and this year presented extra challenges. The trucks have cleared the border as of December 12 and are on the way to the WFSS operations center in Wau. After unloading the supplies our team will take a short Christmas holiday break, and then be ready to go in early January.

 

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New Drilling Rigs

Our two new drilling rigs are each on the way, with expected arrivals at our operations center in December and January. The larger 501 PAT rig (pictured at right) is currently on an ocean-going vessel, due to arrive at the port in Mombasa, Kenya, later this month.

 

Maximizing Resources

In order to maximize resources, the rehab team will start 2019 with the drilling team. The drilling team will drill new wells and install all hardware, pipes and pumps, and then move on to the next village. The rehab team will then serve as a platform team to finish the wells, installing concrete platforms and drainage channels. This will speed up the new well process to ensure that we can drill as many wells as possible.

The rehab team will then go back to rehabilitating wells in early spring to finish out their season and reach their goals.

 

Security Reports from South Sudan

We are in constant contact with our team, who continually monitor safety and security. Our team reports that the area around our operations center, and the areas in which we plan to drill and rehabilitate wells, have been stable and safe.

Our team also reports that more IDPs (internally displaced persons) are returning home from refugee camps. As we start our 15th season, WFSS is well aware of safety and security issues. Our team is in full contact with government and security forces in South Sudan and works diligently to maintain the safety of our teams and equipment.

WFSS remains cautiously optimistic that the recent peace deal, signed in September, 2018, will hold and the country will become more stable, and much-needed development can continue.

 

THANK YOU!

Thanks to supporters in all 50 states and 51 other countries, WFSS has now drilled 350 new wells, rehabilitated 83 older wells and provided hygiene education to 252 villages, impacting over 300,000 people. We look forward to continuing to water the seeds of change in South Sudan. Thanks for your support!

 

Water is Sacred and Holy in South Sudan

The following essay was written by WFSS Compound Manager Abraham Majur.

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Since time in memorial, South Sudanese beliefs, norms, and values have considered water to be sacred. A "water point" as referred to in this narrative includes: pools, rivers, hand pumps/boreholes, hand dug wells, swamp, and lakes, among others.

Holiness of Water Points and Water

The South Sudanese Dinka traditionalists believe that God resides around water points, and that water is “god.” Water has a spirit that can curse people if evil things are done at Water Points. In earlier days, Dinka elders advised young people to avoid going to rivers, swamps, pools, hand pumps/hand dug wells at late hours of the night and early mornings. Elders told that late at night, the spirits and ghosts gather along river and in swamps at those hours.

This perception has protected water points for a long time in South Sudan, even during the two wars of Sudan.

When Dinkas are making their traditional sacrifices to their “gods” the Spearmasters or Sectional/Clan elders first give water to animals to be sacrificed. The notion is that the animal will urinate and there would be enough blood. They consider this as a sign of acceptance of their sacrifice by their “gods” and ancestors. During sacrifices amongst Dinkas when animal meat is consumed, clan elders would spray young people and clan members with water, which they believe it has blessing for their “gods” and ancestors.According to the Dinka tradition, you cannot kill anything while drinking at a water point, be it wild or domestic animals/birds. Even at points of conflict, a defected enemy would not be denied access to a water point or killed while drinking. Killing enemies while they’re drinking water is believed to attract a curse on the doer and his family in present and future. 

Traditions and Stories About Water Points

There are a good number of tribes and sections of Dinka clans who sacrifice for sacred Water Points, usually to rivers and other specific Water Points in their respective localities. For example, in Yirol East, currently part of Eastern Lakes State, a section called Dhiem of Ador offers sacrifices to Lake Shambe and Ajiek sacrifices to River Payii. There are many others but those are a few examples.

From left to right: Abraham (author), and Associate Country Directors  AJ  and  A ter

From left to right: Abraham (author), and Associate Country Directors AJ and Ater

Water for South Sudan's Wells

WFSS has drilled over 300 wells, and none of the wells have been reported vandalized or destroyed by any parties (government or rebel forces).

We are assured of the protection of the wells by users and local authorities in those respective areas.

In this regard our donors and supporters should know that their efforts, talents, resources, and time are not at waste but in service of local communities in South Sudan who have been disadvantaged by two wars of Sudan for years and current conflict.

2017-18 Season Has Begun!

a student at zogolona primary school tests first well of 2017-18 season.

a student at zogolona primary school tests first well of 2017-18 season.

The Water for South Sudan drilled the first well of the 2017-18 season for the Zogalona Primary School near Wau and the WFSS Operations Center.

The WFSS team has been meeting with staff at the Zogalona school to explore the possibility of installing a latrine pilot project. The school is eager to have a small latrine pilot, but first they needed a well.

WFSS Associate Country Director Ajang Agok led the team and is pleased to have the first well completed so early in the season. The team is looking into drilling another well for a school near Wau before they head north to Aweil for the bulk of the 2017-18 season, where they will also focus on schools needing wells.

The WFSS rehab team, formed in 2017, will join the drilling team for the first month of drilling, doing the finishing work of installing the well platforms, allowing the drilling team to go on ahead to the next village well site. After the first month the rehab team will focus on its work of repairing the well platforms and drainage channels of some of WFSS's older wells, to ensure their continued use and sustainability.

the long drainage channel from the wfss well directs run-off from the well to a drinking pool for animals, far removed from the well head.

the long drainage channel from the wfss well directs run-off from the well to a drinking pool for animals, far removed from the well head.

The WFSS Hygiene Education teams travel with the drilling and rehab teams, providing hygiene education in every village we serve. Plans for 2017-18 include drilling up to 40 new wells, repairing up to 50 older wells, and providing hygiene education training in up to 90 villages.

As WFSS enters its 15th year we look to grow and develop our operations as we continue to serve the people of South Sudan. We thank our donors across the US and around the world who enable our work.

WFSS Celebrates World Toilet Day in Wau

wau residents participate in activities marking world toilet day.

wau residents participate in activities marking world toilet day.

64% of people in the world live without toilets.

In 2013, the United Nation’s Assembly declared November 19th as World Toilet Day to bring awareness to the importance of having a toilet. Today 4.5 billion people live without sanitation facilities in their households – more people in the world have cell phones than toilets.

Sanitation is a public health issue. According to the charity Wherever the Need, poor sanitation kills more people than HIV and AIDS, malaria, and measles combined. Poor sanitation leads to diarrhea. In 2015 there were 508,9541 known deaths across the globe from diarrhea of children under five. South Sudan ranks number 34 worldwide in deaths of children under five from diarrhea, with 3,243 in 2015. Sanitation is the single most cost-effective public health intervention to reduce child mortality2.

Sanitation also contributes to social injustice and poverty. When schools do not have sanitation facilities children, especially girls, often stay out of school-- either from illness, or in the case of girls, menstruation. There is a 15 percent increase in girls’ attendance rate once a toilet is introduced in a school.3 Women can’t work when they are forced to walk for water. Farmers and wage earners are less productive when they are not healthy due to poor sanitation. The World Health Organization states that there is $9 in economic benefit for every $1 spent on sanitation.

teaching children about sanitation practices in wau.

teaching children about sanitation practices in wau.

teaching children can help lead to greater behavior change in developing countries.

teaching children can help lead to greater behavior change in developing countries.

WFSS joined the world in celebrating World Toilet Day on November 19th. WFSS Compound Manager Abraham Majur Laam participated in a live radio talk show sponsored by WFSS. The panel also included the Directorate of Public Utilities and a representative from OXFAM GB. The show was interactive with listeners asking questions and sharing concerns about sanitation. Topics ranged from the construction of pit latrines to washing hands after toilet use to sustainability of facilities.

Other WFSS staff members helped to educate internally displaced persons at the Hai Masna camp in Wau. In addition to WFSS, there were delegates from Christians for Action, Relief, and Development; OXFAM GB; South Sudan Relief and Rehabilitation Commission; Directorate of Public Utilities; and Norwegian Refugee Council. Educational dramas were used to demonstrate how to build a pit latrine using locally available materials and how to use a latrine. Songs carrying messages about hygiene and sanitation were sung and soaps were distributed.

To date, WFSS has drilled 304 wells in remote villages in South Sudan. Since 2014, WFSS has provided hygiene training to 1,584 people in 198 villages, who then train the rest of their communities in best hygiene practices, impacting over 100,000 people to date. WFSS is currently exploring an opportunity to build latrines in a school in South Sudan. 

 

1.        www.UNwater.org

2.       World Bank 2006

3.       Wherever the Need

Celebrating World Water Day!

Just Water, Drilling Updates, and Events in NYC & NJ

Water for South Sudan joins the world in recognizing the need for clean water for all people.

March 22 marks the annual celebration of World Water Day. WFSS is celebrating with an initiative called "Just Water" to raise awareness of the many needs that water fills, and how access to clean water is an inalienable human right.

Please consider supporting this initiative by learning more about the impacts of clean water on the people of South Sudan, and by sharing this information with others. Please also consider donating to our campaign for World Water Week. 

 

WFSS fully supports the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Our work in South Sudan underscores the importance of SDG Goal #6, which is to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.

The UN notes that water and sanitation are at the core of sustainable development, critical to the survival of people and the planet. Goal 6 not only addresses issues relating to drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene, but also the quality and sustainability of water resources.

SALVA DUT, lYNN MALOOLY, AND WILL KENNEDY AT THE UN IN NEW YORK CITY.

SALVA DUT, lYNN MALOOLY, AND WILL KENNEDY AT THE UN IN NEW YORK CITY.

Salva in D.C., NJ, and NYC

WFSS Founder Salva Dut and Executive Director Lynn Malooly were in D.C. earlier this week for a congressional panel on WASH (Water, Sanitation & Hygiene) and Agriculture. The rest of the week they will be in New York City and New Jersey for meetings, interviews, and special events. Please check our upcoming events page for more information on meeting them and hearing more about our work.

Work Continues in South Sudan

The WFSS teams are continuing their work in South Sudan, bringing access to clean water and hygiene education to those in need. Our 2017 season has been ongoing. Unrest in South Sudan, and famine being declared in parts of the country, only underscores the importance of our work, and of our grassroots efforts for development in the world's newest country.

THE FIRST WELL DRILLED OF THE 2016-17 SEASON.

THE FIRST WELL DRILLED OF THE 2016-17 SEASON.

As of March 21, the WFSS Drilling Team has completed 10 new wells. This year the drilling team is focusing on drilling wells in school areas.

The WFSS Rehab Team, a new pilot program this year, has completed the rehabilitation of 14 of our oldest wells. Our 2015 well evaluation project showed us that some of the oldest wells needed to have the cement platforms surrounding the wells repaired. The new rehab team has set out to repair these wells to our updated design specifications. WFSS is now using a stronger cement mixture for all well platforms, and has also lengthened the channel leading from the pumps down to the drinking pools for animals.

a rehabbed well with updated design.

a rehabbed well with updated design.

This year we have two hygiene education teams in the field, traveling with both drilling and rehab teams, where they work with villagers to identify hygiene practices in need of improvement.

Although the news out of South Sudan continues to show the struggles of the new nation, WFSS has been able to continue our operations. We are in regular contact with our teams who report that they are safe, and able to travel and continue regular operations.

Thank you to all of our supporters around the world who enable our work. 

We will continue to update you on the progress of this season. Please check back here for regular updates. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Sign up for the WFSS email news here.

Work Continues in South Sudan- 6 New Wells & 6 Rehabbed Wells

WFSS drilling team with first well of 2017.

WFSS drilling team with first well of 2017.

The WFSS teams are continuing their work in South Sudan, bringing access to clean water and hygiene education to those in need.

As of February 28, the WFSS Drilling Team had completed five new wells, and was finishing the sixth. This year the drilling team is focusing on drilling wells in school areas.

The WFSS Rehab Team, a new pilot program this year, has completed the rehabilitation of five of our oldest wells. Our 2015 well evaluation project showed us that some of the oldest wells needed to have the cement platforms surrounding the wells repaired. The new rehab team has set out to repair these wells to our newer design specifications. WFSS is now using a stronger cement mixture for all well platforms, and has also lengthened the channel leading from the pumps down to the drinking pools for animals.

This year we have two hygiene education teams in the field, traveling with both drilling and rehab teams, where they work with villagers to identify hygiene practices in need of improvement.

Although the news out of South Sudan continues to show the struggles of the new nation, with famine declared in two counties in Unity State, WFSS has been able to continue our operations. We are in regular contact with our teams who report that they are safe, and able to travel and continue regular operations.

Thank you to all of our supporters around the world who enable our work. 

We will continue to update you on the progress of this season. Please check back here for regular updates. You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Sign up for the WFSS email news here.

 

WFSS Continues to Transform Lives & Water the Seeds of Change in South Sudan

WFSS Team & United Peace & Development Project Provide 23 New Wells in 2016. 282 Wells Drilled Since 2005.

WFSS IS SUPPORTED BY DONORS IN ALL 50 US STATES, AND 32 OTHER COUNTRIES.

WFSS IS SUPPORTED BY DONORS IN ALL 50 US STATES, AND 32 OTHER COUNTRIES.

WFSS is pleased to announce the conclusion of another successful season. We continue to make progress in every way-- improving design and delivery of services, developing our employees both in the US and South Sudan, which all leads to greater sustainability for the organization, and the work that we do, and enables us to better serve the people of South Sudan. 

The WFSS  team was able to drill 20 new wells, and our United Peace and Development Project with Aqua-Africa added an additional three wells for a season total of 23 new wells. Since 2005, WFSS has provided 282 wells in remote villages in South Sudan.

As our number of wells drilled, and people served, grows, so do the supporters around the world who enable our work. With the recent addition of Cambodia, we are pleased to announce that 32 countries, in addition to the US, support WFSS.

As our South Sudan and US operations teams work to always improve our processes, they also strive to make better use of time and resources. When the start of this year's season was delayed, the drilling team used the extra time to repair 20 wells drilled by other organizations near our compound in Wau.

We thank our South Sudan management team, Salva Dut, Executive Director for East African Operations, Ater Akol Thiep and Ajang Abrahm Agok, our Field Operations Managers, Abraham Majur Laam, our Operations Center Manager, and Mathew Akuar, our Hygiene Team Manager, for all they do to support our mission.

WFSS Hygiene Education Expands Impact of Clean Water

boys bathing in gaikou village

boys bathing in gaikou village

Since 2014, the WFSS hygiene team has traveled with the drilling team to help villagers improve hygiene practices in every village in which we drill. The hygiene team trains a team of eight people (four men and four women) who can then train others. The WFSS team works with the trainers to identify areas in need of improvement in their village. Improved hygiene helps expand the impact of clean water, and leads to better health for all.

In Gaikou village, Achan Aguei told the team that villagers were suffering for a long time from drinking stagnant water, sometimes the same water where people might bathe and clean their clothes and utensils.  "We were not aware that you can wash the inside of jerry cans with ash, gravel and soap," she said.

WFSS hygiene team helps villagers in gaikou identify hygiene areas needing improvement

WFSS hygiene team helps villagers in gaikou identify hygiene areas needing improvement

Gau Majok, also of Gaikou village,  noted that his community did not know that contaminated water made them sick. 

"After Water for South Sudan, drilled a well for us and trained us about water and hygiene management, we realized that we were drinking water with germs and we had bad hygiene at our homes before and from now on we will call a meeting to tell everybody about water and new hygiene promoting ways, as taught by Water for South Sudan hygiene team, which is the first time for us to receive well/borehole and new hygiene promotion training. I appreciate Water for South Sudan, administration and management where ever you are, thank you so much for help."

Achan noted how much life can improve with hygiene training. 

"Now when we compare our life before, with simple things that Water for South Sudan has shown us with two days training, it helps me now to know what is good and bad. Thanks to Water for South Sudan. I hope Water for South Sudan will help other people in South Sudan like us also."

 

United Peace & Development Project Continues

The United Peace & Development Project (UPDP) began in 2014, with Water for South Sudan and Omaha, Nebraska based Aqua-Africa (A-A) coming together to drill water wells in South Sudan. The leaders of the two organizations, Salva Dut (WFSS) and Buey Ray Tut (A-A) saw the value of working together as South Sudanese to help their new country develop, despite being from the two major tribes, Dinka and Nuer, who have historically been in conflict. Since December 2013, the unrest and power struggles in the country have centered on issues between leaders from the two tribes.

united peace & development well drilled in 2015

united peace & development well drilled in 2015

The UPDP continued through 2016, with three new wells being drilled, for a total of 12 wells drilled overall, in various parts of the country, in different tribal areas.

One of the 2016 wells was drilled in Langabu, in Central Equatoria State, where Limoba Jory, a widowed mother of two, cultivates and sells charcoal for a living. When asked about the challenges of water, she pointed to a six foot hole surrounded by thirsty bees. She explained how she must leave her children home alone even though there is a threat of child kidnappers.

“I wait in queue before the sun rises and when it’s my turn, I have to dig until I find water,” she said.

After the completion of the drilling, the UPDP team returned to follow-up and asked how the conflict in South Sudan has affected people. Mrs. Jory explained that the conflict has not impacted their day to day living as they are removed from conflict areas. But she noted the value of getting clean water, and the impact of those providing it.

“We hear a lot of things but the only thing I know for a fact about the Nuer and Dinka now is that they give my children clean water.” 

WFSS and A-A will continue working on the UPDP, bringing access to fresh water, along with peace and development, in the newest country in the world.

Clean Water for a Happy Mother's Day

Women walking for water in south sudan

Women walking for water in south sudan

Cards, chocolates and flowers will be given to many women this Sunday. As preparations are made to honor moms on Mother's Day, May 8, the need for many women in the developing world is starkly different. Women need clean water to keep themselves and their children safe, healthy and alive.

The health of women and children, particularly pregnant women and young children, is often directly linked to the access of clean water, sanitation and hygiene. Without clean water, women and children can be more prone to infection. Without access to water or proper hygiene and sanitation (toilets) women and children are more vulnerable to experiencing violence as they must travel farther to collect water or relieve themselves. Without access to clean water, the hope of an education is gone, as often times, the task of collecting water falls to girls. When girls spend their days walking for water, as they often do in South Sudan, there is no time to attend school.

Read more about the need for complete WASH (water, sanitation, hygiene) programs to ensure maternal health: No Maternal Health Without Clean Water by Katie Millar, MPH, RN, Technical Writer and Publication Coordinator, Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene would be our wish to help every mother have a Happy Mother's Day.

To give the gift of clean water to women and children, in honor of a mother in your life, please visit our donate page.

WFSS & Sustainability Goals- Working Toward a Better Future

This is another post in our continuing series of Water Wednesday blog posts by students at the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, NY.

WFSS kids.jpg

Water is a universal need that is also a scarce resource. Unfortunately, this need increases with every day and the world needs to find a way to make water accessible to everyone who needs it. Torgny Holmgren, Executive Director of the Swedish International Water Institute (SIWI), told a panel discussion on water and the landscape approach, “There is an increasing demand and competition for water resources, so we need to be more efficient in the way we allocate water.”  

This is where the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals come in. Although Goal 6, Ensure access to water and sanitation for all, and the other Sustainable Development Goals have been met with a great amount of positivity, there are some who are not as sure of the impact that these goals will have on the world.

One such person is David Kuria, author of Sustainable Development Goals: Another Wasteful Venture for Kenya? Kuria, in his article, is wary of placing focus on global change. He suggests that “instead of prescribing a broad set of 17 goals for the world, we should instead be guided by a country’s own development priorities.” In his opinion, each country should make its own priorities because making generalizations about what needs to be fixed in the world may leave out some of the needs of different countries.

While this is a valid concern and countries should make sure that they are meeting the needs of their people, the Sustainable Development Goals are a much-needed stepping stone towards ending issues such as poverty, hunger, and lack of access to clean water. These goals, and other organizations that have the same objectives, encourage all who have the capability to change people’s lives. For the goals to be reached, all need to do their part: governments, the private sector, civil society and the people of the world. 

Water for South Sudan (WFSS) is committed to transforming lives by providing access to fresh water and hygiene education, and has been on the ground in South Sudan since 2005. Bringing access and education to those in need in remote villages, we are making a difference and helping people take a step towards a better future. 

As of August, 2015, WFSS has drilled 259 wells. Hygiene education has been a part of our work since 2014, and plans are underway to begin researching sanitation solutions in the areas in which we drill. The new season is set to begin in January, 2016. Goals include visiting 40 new villages to install wells and provide hygiene education, and launching a new pilot project which plans to rehabilitate the cement platforms of 20 older wells. 

Providing Access to Clean Water in South Sudan

This is the second in our series of Water Wednesday blogs, written by students at the Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement at St. John Fisher College in Rochester, NY.

Water from pump.jpg

South Sudan is the world’s newest country, gaining independence from greater Sudan on July 9, 2011. However, this fledgling country faces many challenges, including battling epidemic diseases. Unfortunately, due to lack of clean water and thereby proper sanitation, there have been several cholera outbreaks in South Sudan. As of July 31, 2015, there were 1,396 cholera cases reported in Juba and Bor Counties in the state of Central Equatoria. In Juba County alone, 1,280 cases of cholera, including 41 deaths, occurred. In Bor County, there were 116 cholera cases including one death. South Sudan has 10 states and at least 78 counties. The above results are reported from two counties and one state alone. Therefore, this cholera outbreak is urgent and action is needed to try to prevent it from happening again.

These cholera outbreaks could have been prevented had South Sudan had adequate access to clean water, which would have improved the overall hygiene of the South Sudanese. Cholera is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae infecting the intestine. People become infected with cholera by consuming food or water that is polluted with feces or vomit of someone harboring the infection. This leads to severe diarrhea and vomiting, which expels significant amounts of fluid from the body.

Water for South Sudan (WFSS) operates in the WASH sector, which stands for water, sanitation, and hygiene. WASH aims to help achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 6, which is to “Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” by 2030. By drilling clean water wells, WFSS helps more South Sudanese have access to clean drinking water and necessary hygiene, which can help prevent cholera outbreaks. WFSS’s role in bringing clean water to South Sudan is critical in increasing overall health and reducing deaths in the South Sudanese population.

However, only 55 percent of South Sudanese have access to clean drinking water, and about 30-60 liters of water per cholera patient per day is needed for his/her cleaning, bathing, clothes’ washing, and drinking. Ninety-seven percent of water in South Sudan is currently used for agriculture, which significantly limits the South Sudanese’s ability to obtain sufficient hygiene and prevent the spread of diseases like cholera.

As a result, organizations like Water for South Sudan need your support. If you would like to learn more about how to donate, please visit https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/waterforsouthsudan.

 

Plans Underway for 2015-16 Season

As the 2014-15 drilling season was winding down, WFSS Director of Operations and Board Member Don Fairman traveled from Rochester, New York to Wau, South Sudan to meet with our drilling team and staff. Don worked with both of our Field Operations Managers, Ater Akol Thiep, and Ajang “AJ” Abraham Agok. They worked to improve procedures and efficiencies in our Wau office. Then, when the drilling team returned to our operations center, Don and the team went over equipment and vehicle needs, looking at maintenance and repair needs, and planning for the next drilling season.

Findings from our well evaluation report show a need to improve the concrete platforms that surround each well. We will launch a new well rehabilitation team this season. Ater and AJ will start the drilling season together, drilling new wells using a new platform design, and an improved method for mixing concrete. Once they have mastered the new process and design, one of the managers will lead our newly formed well rehabilitation team, while the other will continue to lead the drilling team.

the united peace and development project will continue in 2015-16, with plans for at least two more wells.

the united peace and development project will continue in 2015-16, with plans for at least two more wells.

The goal of this new pilot project will be to re-do the concrete platforms of some of our oldest wells and those most in need of repair. 

While significant resources will go to the critically important work of platform rehabilitation, WFSS will make every effort to drill up to 40 new wells this coming season, and continue the work of the Hygiene Education Team. We will continue to educate villagers on maintaining wells and their surrounding areas, sharing improved practices we have developed over our 10 year history.

 

 

In 2015-16 WFSS plans to:

  • Drill up to 40 new wells, using a new concrete platform design

  • Launch a pilot well rehab team to rehabilitate 20 older wells, installing new concrete platforms and fencing

  • Conduct hygiene education with each new well drilled

  • Work with Aqua-Africa on the continuing United Peace & Development Project

  • Improve efficiencies in operations

  • Explore opportunities and collaborations in South Sudan

As more wells are drilled in South Sudan, the total number of people served by each well has begun to decrease. This is an important quality of life issue. Whereas some of the earliest wells might have served over 3,000 people, numbers served by new wells this past season averaged under 1,000 people per well.  As more people have access to fresh water wells, they also have access to more water, and can begin to use water for more uses, including gardening and farming. Our well evaluation survey showed us that gardens, and an additional source of fresh food, were one result of more clean water.

Our US administration team also plans to travel to South Sudan this coming year, to meet with government officials, and non-governmental organizations doing development and humanitarian work in South Sudan. We look forward to continued collaboration in the WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) sector, and expanding our impact.